tendency_of_sea_water_temperature_due_to_horizontal_mixing

complete
Created: Feb. 5, 2024
Proposer: Jonathan Gregory & Lars Barring
Proposed Date: 2024-01-10
#270
Change Date: Feb. 5, 2024, 4:52 p.m.
Term: tendency_of_sea_water_temperature_due_to_horizontal_mixing
Unit: K s-1
Unit ref: KPRS
AMIP:
GRIB:
The phrase "tendency_of_X" means derivative of X with respect to time. The specification of a physical process by the phrase due_to_process means that the quantity named is a single term in a sum of terms which together compose the general quantity named by omitting the phrase. "Horizontal mixing" means any horizontal transport other than by advection and parameterized eddy advection, usually represented as horizontal diffusion in ocean models. Sea water temperature is the in situ temperature of the sea water. For observed data, depending on the period during which the observation was made, the measured in situ temperature was recorded against standard "scales". These historical scales include the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1948 (IPTS-48; 1948-1967), the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (IPTS-68, Barber, 1969; 1968-1989) and the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90, Saunders 1990; 1990 onwards). Conversion of data between these scales follows t68 = t48 - (4.4 x 10e-6) * t48(100 - t - 48); t90 = 0.99976 * t68. Observations made prior to 1948 (IPTS-48) have not been documented and therefore a conversion cannot be certain. Differences between t90 and t68 can be up to 0.01 at temperatures of 40 C and above; differences of 0.002-0.007 occur across the standard range of ocean temperatures (-10 - 30 C). The International Equation of State of Seawater 1980 (EOS-80, UNESCO, 1981) and the Practical Salinity Scale (PSS-78) were both based on IPTS-68, while the Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010 (TEOS-10) is based on ITS-90. References: Barber, 1969, doi: 10.1088/0026-1394/5/2/001; UNESCO, 1981; Saunders, 1990, WOCE Newsletter, 10, September 1990.
Change Date: Feb. 5, 2024, 4:58 p.m.
Term: tendency_of_sea_water_temperature_due_to_horizontal_mixing
Unit: K s-1
Unit ref: KPRS
AMIP:
GRIB:
The phrase "tendency_of_X" means derivative of X with respect to time. The specification of a physical process by the phrase due_to_process means that the quantity named is a single term in a sum of terms which together compose the general quantity named by omitting the phrase. "Horizontal mixing" means any horizontal transport other than by advection and parameterized eddy advection, usually represented as horizontal diffusion in ocean models. Sea water temperature is the in situ temperature of the sea water. For observed data, depending on the period during which the observation was made, the measured in situ temperature was recorded against standard "scales". These historical scales include the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1948 (IPTS-48; 1948-1967), the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (IPTS-68, Barber, 1969; 1968-1989) and the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90, Saunders 1990; 1990 onwards). Conversion of data between these scales follows t68 = t48 - (4.4 x 10e-6) * t48(100 - t - 48); t90 = 0.99976 * t68. Observations made prior to 1948 (IPTS-48) have not been documented and therefore a conversion cannot be certain. Differences between t90 and t68 can be up to 0.01 at temperatures of 40 C and above; differences of 0.002-0.007 occur across the standard range of ocean temperatures (-10 - 30 C). The International Equation of State of Seawater 1980 (EOS-80, UNESCO, 1981) and the Practical Salinity Scale (PSS-78) were both based on IPTS-68, while the Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010 (TEOS-10) is based on ITS-90. References: Barber, 1969, doi: 10.1088/0026-1394/5/2/001; UNESCO, 1981; Saunders, 1990, WOCE Newsletter, 10, September 1990. It is strongly recommended to include a units_metadata attribute.
Change Date: Feb. 9, 2024, 3:52 p.m.
Term: tendency_of_sea_water_temperature_due_to_horizontal_mixing
Unit: K s-1
Unit ref: KPRS
AMIP:
GRIB:
The phrase "tendency_of_X" means derivative of X with respect to time. The specification of a physical process by the phrase due_to_process means that the quantity named is a single term in a sum of terms which together compose the general quantity named by omitting the phrase. "Horizontal mixing" means any horizontal transport other than by advection and parameterized eddy advection, usually represented as horizontal diffusion in ocean models. Sea water temperature is the in situ temperature of the sea water. For observed data, depending on the period during which the observation was made, the measured in situ temperature was recorded against standard "scales". These historical scales include the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1948 (IPTS-48; 1948-1967), the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (IPTS-68, Barber, 1969; 1968-1989) and the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90, Saunders 1990; 1990 onwards). Conversion of data between these scales follows t68 = t48 - (4.4 x 10e-6) * t48(100 - t - 48); t90 = 0.99976 * t68. Observations made prior to 1948 (IPTS-48) have not been documented and therefore a conversion cannot be certain. Differences between t90 and t68 can be up to 0.01 at temperatures of 40 C and above; differences of 0.002-0.007 occur across the standard range of ocean temperatures (-10 - 30 C). The International Equation of State of Seawater 1980 (EOS-80, UNESCO, 1981) and the Practical Salinity Scale (PSS-78) were both based on IPTS-68, while the Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010 (TEOS-10) is based on ITS-90. References: Barber, 1969, doi: 10.1088/0026-1394/5/2/001; UNESCO, 1981; Saunders, 1990, WOCE Newsletter, 10, September 1990. In order to convert the units correctly, it is essential to know whether a temperature is on-scale or a difference. Therefore this standard strongly recommends that any variable whose units involve a temperature unit should also have a units_metadata attribute to make the distinction. units_metadata="temperature: difference" means that the temperature quantity is the difference between two temperatures, so the origin of the scale is irrelevant, and only the unit of measure matters. It is strongly recommended to include the attribute units_metadata="temperature: difference".
Change Date: Feb. 23, 2024, 4:30 p.m.
Term: tendency_of_sea_water_temperature_due_to_horizontal_mixing
Unit: K s-1
Unit ref: KPRS
AMIP:
GRIB:
The phrase "tendency_of_X" means derivative of X with respect to time. The specification of a physical process by the phrase due_to_process means that the quantity named is a single term in a sum of terms which together compose the general quantity named by omitting the phrase. "Horizontal mixing" means any horizontal transport other than by advection and parameterized eddy advection, usually represented as horizontal diffusion in ocean models. Sea water temperature is the in situ temperature of the sea water. For observed data, depending on the period during which the observation was made, the measured in situ temperature was recorded against standard "scales". These historical scales include the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1948 (IPTS-48; 1948-1967), the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (IPTS-68, Barber, 1969; 1968-1989) and the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90, Saunders 1990; 1990 onwards). Conversion of data between these scales follows t68 = t48 - (4.4 x 10e-6) * t48(100 - t - 48); t90 = 0.99976 * t68. Observations made prior to 1948 (IPTS-48) have not been documented and therefore a conversion cannot be certain. Differences between t90 and t68 can be up to 0.01 at temperatures of 40 C and above; differences of 0.002-0.007 occur across the standard range of ocean temperatures (-10 - 30 C). The International Equation of State of Seawater 1980 (EOS-80, UNESCO, 1981) and the Practical Salinity Scale (PSS-78) were both based on IPTS-68, while the Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010 (TEOS-10) is based on ITS-90. References: Barber, 1969, doi: 10.1088/0026-1394/5/2/001; UNESCO, 1981; Saunders, 1990, WOCE Newsletter, 10, September 1990. It is strongly recommended that a variable with this standard name should have the attribute units_metadata="temperature: difference", meaning that it refers to temperature differences and implying that the origin of the temperature scale is irrelevant, because it is essential to know whether a temperature is on-scale or a difference in order to convert the units correctly (cf. https://cfconventions.org/cf-conventions/cf-conventions.html#temperature-units).